SillyClocks

SillyClocks 2.2 is a software that displays several clocks which will help you losing some time while trying to figure out what time it is.

Time is on our side. Yes it is!

SillyClocks logo

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SillyClocks offers a minkukel approach to time keeping. Version 2.2 offers eleven different clocks.

SillyClocks 2.2 is FREEWARE. You can now use SillyClocks without restrictions and without time limit.

Webkukel

 

Normal Clock

This clock shows the time of your computer clock in the 24 hours format.


 

Binary Clock

We live in a computer age, and everybody knows that computers deep inside use a binary system to manipulate data. This binary clock uses a binary numeral system employing only the digits 0 and 1 to show the time.

The binary clock shows the same time as the normal computer clock, but the hours, minutes and seconds are represented by binary numbers.

This table shows binary equivalents of some decimal numbers

Decimal Binary
0 0
1 1
2 10
3 11
4 100
5 101
6 110
7 111
8 1000

Binary Clock

Click here for more information on binary clocks.

 

Metric Clock

Length, area, volume and weight are measured with a decimalized (base 10) system: the metric system (except in some Stone Age countries where miles, acres, pints and ounces are used). Time is a global exception and with its twenty four hours per day, sixty minutes per hour, and sixty seconds per minute is using a exagesimal (base 60) numeral system.

The metric clock uses a metric system for displaying time. It divides a day in 10 hours, each hour in 100 minutes, and each minute in 100 second. The sun reaches its highest point at 5 o'clock.

Metric Clock


For more information on a metric clock see:
http://www.minkukel.com/en/time/metric_clock.htm

 

Roman Clock

The ancient Romans used a numeral system based on letters of the alphabet. Letters are combined to signify the sum of their values. It is a decimal system but the digits are not directly positional. The Roman numeral system does not include a zero.

The letters used in this system are:

I    =    1
V    =    5
X    =    10
L    =    50
C    =    100
D    =    500
M    =    1000

The first twenty five Roman numerals are:

I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, XIV, XV, XVI, XVII,
XVIII, IXX, XX, XXI, XXII, XXIII, XXIV, XXV

The Roman clock shows the time in hours, minutes and seconds using Roman numerals.

Roman Clock

 

Degrees Clock

In a day of 24 hours the earth makes one complete turn of 360 degrees. This means that time can be measured in degrees. At noon the earth has turned 180 degrees.

The Degrees clock shows the time in degrees, where degrees are a real number. This system of showing degrees of a circle is often called DegDec (Degrees Decimal).

Degrees Clock

 

DMS Clock

The DMS clock is similar to the Degrees clock, but now the time is shown as Degrees, Minutes and Seconds (DMS). This system of showing degrees is very common on geographical maps.

Degrees are identified with the °symbol, minutes are identified with the ‘ symbol and seconds are identified with the ” symbol. For example 20 degrees 12 minutes and 5 seconds is written as 20° 12′ 5″

DMS Clock

 

Sine Clock

 The Sine clock is a bit tricky. It is related to the Degrees clock, but it shows the Sine of the angle (where the angle is expressed in radians, 360 degrees is 2π radians).
During the first half of the day the Sine time is a positive real number between 0 and 1. During the second part of the day the Sine time is a negative number. The tricky part is that the same time can appear twice (see graph).

Sine clock graph

The graph shows that for example at 2:00 AM and at 10:00 AM the Sine time would be the same (that is 5.0). The difference is that at 2:00 AM the graph is going up, while at 10:00 AM the graphs is going down.

Therefore the clock shows at each moment whether the Sine is going up (using the / symbol) or down (using the \ symbol). The \ symbol appears at daytime, between 6:00 AM and 18:00 PM.

At 2:00 AM the Sine time would be 0.50/, and at 10:00 AM the Sine times is 0.50\.

At exactly 6:00 AM and 18:00 PM the Sine is not going up or down, so the / and \ symbols are omitted. At 6:00 AM the Sine time is 1.00 and at 18:00 PM the Sine time is -1.00

Sine Clock

 

Percentage Clock

A fairly easy to understand clock is the Percentage clock, which shows the percentage of the day that has gone by. At 18:00 PM it will show 75% because 18 is 75% of 24 hours.

Percentage Clock

 

Swatch Internet Clock

The Swatch Internet time is a decimal time concept introduced in 1998. Instead of hours and minutes, it divides the day up into 1000 parts called “beats”. Each beat lasts 1 minute and 26.4 seconds. Decimal fractions of a beat are used to add centibeats for more precision.

Swatch Internet Time has no time zones but uses Biel Mean Time (BMT) which is equivalent to UTC+1. Biel, a place in Switzerland, is the location of the headquarters of the Swatch Corporation. UTC is Coordinated Universal Time, which is mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich. It is almost the same as Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

Swatch Internet Clock

 

Hexadecimal Clock

The hexadecimal numbering system uses 16 as the base (as opposed to 10). The hexadecimal clock shows hours, minutes, and seconds as a hexadecimal number.

Hexadecimal Clock

 

Morse Clock

Samuel Morse (1791 – 1872) was the inventor of a single-wire telegraph system and Morse code. Morse code is a type of character encoding that uses a sequence of short and long elements to represent letters, numerals, punctuation and other characters in a message. The short and long elements (usually sounds or pulses) are known as “dots” and “dashes” or “dits” and “dahs”.

The morse codes for numerals used are:

—–    =    0
.—-    =    1
..—    =    2
…–    =    3
….-    =    4
…..    =    5
-….    =    6
–…    =    7
—..    =    8
—-.    =    9

The Morse codes for a colon punctuation mark is: —…

The Morse clock shows the time in hours, minutes and seconds using these Morse codes.

Morse Clock

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Screenshot

This screenshot shows SillyClocks in its default setting with all 10 clocks visible.

SillyClocks Screenshot